Not Murder but a Conundrum

me
Aneta Cruz

This is the last of the Blog Tour interviews with different questions from Aneta Cruz. While I sent this out on Facebook, this is my official reference for everyone to hop over to the CONUNDRUM CORNER. While there you can have a view and perhaps pick up one or two of her books from a most talented and moving author.
http://conundrumcorner.blogspot.com/2014/07/interview-with-tim-desmond.html

Thank you Aneta, for having me on your site.

Tim

Timothy J. Desmond

Blog at: https://timdesmondblog.wordpress.com
Book Page at: http://timothydesmond.wordpress.com
Amazon author page at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00694KQQO
Art at: http://artbydesmond.wordpress.com

Murder Lab Interview

Author Kristen Elise
Kristin Elise

I am pleased to send you over to a marvelous blog called “Murder Lab” by author Kristin Elise.
http://www.murderlab.com
Her “knockout” interview of me is posted today on her wonderful site. There is a lot there.

Timothy J. Desmond
Amazon author page at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00694KQQO
Writing at: http://timothydesmond.wordpress.com
Art at: http://artbydesmond.wordpress.com

June 1st Interview by Susan Whitfield

Author Susan Whitfield

It was a surprise that this was posted so quickly over at Book Town. I did not expect it for a couple more weeks. Too, it is quite all right, as the “blog tour” doesn’t have to be all the same day or week. Susan’s Blogspot version is more colorful than the Book Town post. If you have not read it, it is at:
http://www.susanwhitfield.blogspot.com
Thank you Susan for being the first to post an interview for THE DOC release.
Timothy J. Desmond

Blog at: https://timdesmondblog.wordpress.com
Publisher: Black Opal Books: http:// http://www.blackopalbooks.com
Amazon author page at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00694KQQO
Writing at: http://timothydesmond.wordpress.com
Art at: http://artbydesmond.wordpress.com

Is Anybody There?

Blog – Is Anybody There?

About a writer’s time and writer’s following, there was a similar blog recently on another writer site, SHE WRITES. Also this is NaNoWriMo – for November 2012. I jumped in and I am very behind in my word number/stats department. Too, I have a blog here, but I have not blogged in weeks. No excuses…… am just not there. One thing about the promotions and the readership, another recent tip came up that makes sense. I am following half dozen writer sites if not more, so can’t remember the origin, but the tip is to WRITE COMMENTS IN THE BOX, not just click on the LIKE button. This may have come from a Facebook tip, as the rational was that there is so much traffic, that just a LIKE does not get forwarded or sent to all on a person’s or “others” friend or member list.” One writer, blogger, editor friend has mentioned this also with regard to writer sites. Log on and introduce yourself.

And it may be a reality that has been mentioned too, it takes time to build a “following.” It has surprised me how my friends list and followers list has grown, yet I still am not completely sure if that translates to “buyers” or “sells.” Check out KLOUT and LinkedIn.

I am still looking around out there….. “mike in hand”….. fingers at the keys ….. “Is anybody there?”

Timothy J. Desmond
THE DOC, ebook conspiracy thriller novel at
http://amazon.com
SWIM THE RED RIVER short story at

http://www.amazon.com/Swim-River-Short-Fiction-ebook/dp/B008BHPCNY/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1339948726&sr=1-1&keywords=swim+the+red+river
 http://timsfiction-art.com
http://xoxopublishing.com

Tim’s Amazon author page at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00694KQQO

The Rich

The rich have been in the news since the “Occupy” sit-ins.  Well, further back than that of course. Currently the 1% is being blogged about and referred to in “social media” circles.  Is it important to writers? Possibly.  Bookstores are affected by the economy and market trends. I got fairly beat up on a social media comment reply that went five or six rounds. The topic was the 1% and their fair share. You can see where this was going. The other person didn’t believe my point. It came down to neither accepting the other’s premise of the issue, referring to “anti-business” and the 1% rich not paying their “fair share”.  My first response is, “quit complaining and change the tax code.” We know how tough that is. I know there is rich and then there is “the rich.”  Are bookstores rich? Are independent shop owners the rich? Are publishers, the largest press houses a part of the 1%? The other economic factor ignored is that anyone’s money is not a static entity. One spends it. On might save or invest a certain percent. That invested amount gets spent in the other funds of those institutions. The spending goes to others in the local, state businesses, and across the country in online purchases. The money doesn’t stay. The rich, the 1% money gets spent too, back into system near and far, to businesses for purchases. The money they park is going into other earning funds.
I recall an F. Scott Fitzgerald and Hemingway anecdote. Scott said, “I think there is something very different and special about the rich, don’t you?” Hem replied, “Yes. The rich have more money.”

That’s a good example of differing POV between artists in their time. And as the saying goes, “less is more,” they speak volumes. The so-called 1% aren’t any different from us.

Another starving artist signing off here.

Timothy J. Desmond
THE DOC, ebook conspiracy thriller novel at
http://amazon.com
SWIM THE RED RIVER short story at

http://www.amazon.com/Swim-River-Short-Fiction-ebook/dp/B008BHPCNY/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1339948726&sr=1-1&keywords=swim+the+red+river
 http://timsfiction-art.com
http://xoxopublishing.com

Tim’s Amazon author page at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00694KQQO

Character Names

I can’t claim originality on this topic. I replied to Joanne Guidoccios’ blog on this.

This caught my attention immediately. It is difficult to be completely original. One’s character name is really important. Part of the joy of writing fiction is that you can make things up …. that’s right, lies out of whole cloth…. and includes names of characters. At some time in the far past it was all right to use common names if your character was written to represent “everyman” or “everywoman.” So in English that would be John, French is Jaques, Spanish Jose, Irish Shaun, Scottish Sean, Russian Ivan or Ioann, Johannes or Hans in German, etc. the most common names in each culture. For our era, my protagonists need to be original and totally made up. My one exception is that I still like Biblical names that were not as commonly used. I could go on. Read Joanne Guidoccio at: http://joanneguidoccio.com/2012/07/31/selecting-the-right-character-name/#comment-231

In my first novel I used a family friend’s nick name as one major character’s name. Prior to publication I thought it was NOT right to use it. I changed it to another nick name for a fellow from California, “Cal.” It was only later on re-reading John Steinbeck’s East of Eden, that one of his character’s names is also “Cal.” I’ll bet that happens a lot. Names we might like and do not remember why – pop up in our minds.

Fascinating topic. What is your take on the names of your characters?

Timothy J. Desmond
THE DOC, ebook conspiracy thriller novel at
http://amazon.com
SWIM THE RED RIVER short story at

http://www.amazon.com/Swim-River-Short-Fiction-ebook/dp/B008BHPCNY/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1339948726&sr=1-1&keywords=swim+the+red+river
 http://timsfiction-art.com
http://xoxopublishing.com

Tim’s Amazon author page at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00694KQQO

Downton Abbey dreams

This PBS series has been on for a short while, three seasons, which I presume is a measure of some success. So, having recently, discovered that series, and having missed the previous seasons one and two, we went about getting the DVDs for those first two seasons. After watching the entire first season, went to bed and I dreamt of being an English bloke in some farcical situation, as dreams go. The next night we watched part of the second season and for the second evening in a row, I dreamed of being around and in conversation with these similar English blokes. An apparent aberration in a separate dream of the same night, I was getting a coffee and a sandwich at a certain mall lunch spot, and dropped my messy sandwich on the floor and with others watching am on my hands and knees trying to put my sandwich together.

Then later on, during the discussion in the morning, was the realization that in the second season and in the kitchen at Downton Abby, Daisy dropped a platter of game hens [ they were as large as whole fryers] right when the house staff had to serve the dinner. I know that there are many who take stock in deciphering dreams. I am not one of those, but I do believe one’s mind does attempt to dump trash in dreams, much like a computer, and on other occasions attempts to solve problems. Two things on this, which are away from my main point here, are about two different persons I remember who mentioned dreams.  One was a co-worker with whom I had gone to grade school with, said that he had never and does not have dreams. I found that strange. Second person was a painter I met once. She painted large canvases, had a show at “The Met” in our town, told me that she got her subject from dreams. I found her work a waste of paint, no aesthetic value at all and she was Trained at Chicago Art  Institute which was even more astounding. She was quite a sweet person and she had other smaller sized works that I admired.

With Downton Abbey, I found myself becoming involved with the characters, more than usual for me, and even, yes, being moved by their problems. These persons being depicted are my grandparent’s and their parent’s era, which is historically interesting, but has no connection to our American ways living, even if it were about American “blue-blood” “old money” families in New England. My folks on all sides were farmers in the south and California. I will say I had one grandfather in the “Great War” in an Tennessee artillery unit in 30th Division of the American Expeditionary Force. 

So, yes, there is some connection, the production of the visual scenes, whether the estate’s green fields and grounds, attire of the staff, colors, or the earthy English village scenes, what I truly give credit to is the writing. I am reminded of a quote, from whom I do not agree with his politics, but is an answer to much of the above, and for which I am striving in my own writing and art. This from Ezra Pound and I believe it should be the last and most important words of this post. “Move or be moved.” Ezra Pound

More on metaphor use

Apparently there is a  lot here for discussion, pros and cons wise of using metaphor. And, perhaps I was being too visceral in my comment. Avoiding cliche is a good policy. Being original is the best and sometimes the most difficult. But, using too much “show” is a judgment, and I suppose if one goes “over the top” it is reduced to comedy, which may be what is wanted, or just plain silly if not trite. I recall a MASH episode where Col. Potter used about seven different terms all relating to horse droppings and meadow muffins, combining alliteration, allusion and synonym.

I was critiqued once, by a reader, not a writer, for not “having enough description.” This observation was from a “fantasy fan reader.” If I remember correctly, one of the shortest chapters in literature was in the book “As I lay Dying.”  Faulkner wrote his character’s observation, “My mother is a fish.” End of chapter. The character’s mother died. He had observed earlier a rotting fish. One has to show as well as tell. You must be concrete and try to involve all the senses.

On “nervousness” metaphor

A recent blogger wrote on a critique of a newly written metaphor that went something like …. “swooping, sharp pain in the stomach ….” The critique was one of not understanding and that the critiquer did “not get nervous.” The defense reaction of the writer was about trying to “show” and not just “tell” what was the sensation of the nervousness. The reference to “show” and “not just tell” is important.  And this is a lovely example and story from that group and about the critique’s reaction. The showing is so important that it cannot be emphasized enough. How much one writer uses this concept may be the art involved with the craft. The creative use of the language comes in here now. This is where new metaphors come from, from the writer’s imagination. And if these get repeated they become old cliches. As all of us remember the nervousness cliche – “butterflies in the tummy” [or whatever one calls their stomach], but none of us would use it because now it isn’t original. But, you might have a character speaking that – about butterflies.

The critiquer’s comment, while it may be true about not feeling nervous, is a quipping one, and a copout because most people get nervous about something, if not many things. What I am not sure about is if the nervousness in one’s stomach actually becomes “sharp pain” in most people. And that may be the real point the critiquer needed to make. “Swooping” is interesting, because there is familiar sensing of stomach sensations when initiating a free fall or acceleration in rollercoaster, or traveling high speed over a low rise in the road. The sense of fear and dread is another type of emotion, though. It has many anxiety symptoms that can affect the digestive tract that range from vomiting to the other extreme of colon gas to uncontrolled colon in a state of fear. In the middle of one’s torso, yes swooping is good and different. What animals swoop? Birds swoop. Birds have wings like butterflies. A hawk would be too big.  Hummingbirds might swoop and fit. Or a ………… well, that’s my take on this. Use some kind of swooping bird or swooping snakes. Snakes in one’s stomach would make me nervous.

Blog qstn: Where Blog Inspiration comes from?

Mostly to Deborah Luskin, of “LIve to Write” at WordPress…. Thanks for your post. I couldn’t help commenting. I can see how your Vermont regionally “audience” locations make sense. In California, I would like to have that sort of readership down the road. I really was intrigued by your comment about the change of Vermont from Republican to Democratic in nature. If you wrote about that, I have not read it, as I was not connected in this bloggisphere until recently. There are still many of us in central California, and northern California, wondering how the San Francisco Bay area and Los Angeles basin can keep electing legislators who continue driving this once-great-state toward further ruin. But, – to your Vermont history – which I confess much ignorance about – have you had population shifts? And those reasons may be many. I would think that some of the reasons are that the “parties” have shifted. On the entire issue of this question of inspiration for blogs ……… not really an answer but a comment from Mark Twain [Samuel Clemmens] about newspaper editors: “How editors can continue this tremendous labor, this exhausting consumption of brain fiber (for their work is creative, and not a mere mechanical laying up of facts, like reporting), day after day, year after year, is incomprehensible.”